FTC

Twitter is bracing for a US$250 million fine from US regulators for using the phone numbers provided by its users for security to target them with ads. The social platform disclosed the practice in October last year and claims it was done “inadvertently” but can not say how many users

Facebook has settled a long running privacy investigation with the FTC, agreeing to pay a record US$5 billion fine and upgrade its privacy measures. The Australian privacy watchdog has welcomed settlement but says it will continue its own investigation into the social media giant. The FTC settlement was just one

Facebook will receive a US$5 billion fine from American regulators for its failure to protect users’ privacy. Federal Trade Commissioners voted 3-2 in favour of the settlement with the social media behemoth, to conclude its long-running probe stemming from the Cambridge Analytica scandal, according to people familiar with the matter.

The US Justice Department is reportedly setting up an investigation into Google to examine if its businesses have breached antitrust laws. The Wall Street Journal reported the department’s antitrust division has been laying the groundwork for the investigation in recent weeks. The work follows after an agreement with the Federal

Between January and March this year Facebook removed 2.2 billion fake accounts, according to social media giant’s own reporting. The company released the latest figures, vowing to be more transparent as it faces a multi-billion fine and a gathering chatter about a potential break up by American regulators. Nominate today

Facebook told investors it’s setting aside $3 billion to cover an impending fine from the FTC, to settle an investigation which was opened in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The matter remains unresolved, but the company is estimating the fine will be between $3 billion and $5 billion.

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg was not even born in early 1982 when the mandated breakup of Bell System began, a move that ultimately slashed the value of the giant and previously unassailable AT&T by 70 percent. He was 15 when Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson found that Microsoft was