ethics

What do we want driverless cars to do in unavoidable fatal crashes? Today researchers published a paper The Moral Machine experiment to address this question. To create data for the study, almost 40 million people from 233 countries used a website to record decisions about who to save and who

Data and analytics have enormous potential to improve public policy and services by helping governments focus their resources in the areas where they will be most effective. However the risk of deploying machine learning systems which unfairly impact humans lives, because they’ve inherited biases from their human designers, means a

driverless car,

As society trusts more of its operations to autonomous systems, increasingly companies are making it a requirement that humans can understand how exactly a machine has reached a certain conclusion. The research efforts behind Explainable AI (XAI) are gaining traction as technology giants like Microsoft, Google and IBM, agree that

When it comes to the tech giant Google, secret plans to launch a new search service in China prompted a furious reaction from more than 1,400 of the company’s employees. A staff letter, obtained by Buzzfeed and published late last week, says: “To make ethical choices, Googlers need to know

Deleting Facebook, smartphone

Zuckerberg did well during the hearings. He did what he had to do, represent his company to the best of his abilities. He did with an admirable patience, answering questions from senators that were mostly not amongst the best informed. “No, we don’t sell data to advertisers”. The whole setup

Facebook last week announced a redesign of its news feed to prioritise posts from friends and family over those of news publishers. While struggling news organisations are likely to take a hit on their social traffic, the move suggests that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been paying attention to criticisms

As car manufacturers start planning for driverless cars they want liability to reside with the owner – unlike Google which has taken a different tack. Welcome tot the world of adjustable ethics settings. That’s right, you get to choose who to kill. Patrick Linhas recently posted a piece in Wired