encryption

Senate Chamber parliament auspol

Labor is today set to introduce amendments to Australia’s controversial encryption access legislation, calling for more oversight and more proportionality in the use of the powers that the tech industry, privacy advocates and human rights groups have railed against since they were proposed in 2018. The laws, which allow government

Use of Australia’s controversial encryption busting laws ramped up significantly last year, according to analysis of government reports. The access powers were used seven times between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2019, according to a new annual report. But an answer by the Department of Home Affairs to a

One year in to Australia’s controversial encryption busting laws, technology giants are still concerned about the potential “backdoors” being built in to communication systems by security agencies. Stephen Schmidt, CISO at Amazon Web Services, told Which-50 the American tech giant is still worried about the privacy and security consequences of

The Law Council of Australia has told a parliamentary security committee reviewing the government’s controversial encryption busting laws the new powers conflict with privacy regulations in the EU and US. The group has also raised concerns over Minister for Home Affairs’ ability to withhold information from the security ombudsman reviewing

Australia’s controversial encryption busting laws remain a threat to cybersecurity, privacy, US trade and human rights, according to the world’s largest technology companies and civil rights groups. The cohort, represented by the Open Technology Institute, is urging the Australian government to amend or repeal the legislation which passed late last

Facial recognition, a Consumer Data Right and a delay in the review of the controversial encryption laws are among the federal government’s legislation plans for the remainder of 2019.  The full agenda was revealed yesterday at the commencement of Australia’s 46th Parliament. By the end of the year the government

Nobody likes Nazis. Even Nazis aren’t super keen to be associated with them, which is why euphemisms like “ethno-nationalist” and “right-wing extremist” start trending whenever some white supremacist mouth-breather breaks into the news cycle. Increasingly, however, white supremacist mouth-breathers are the news cycle. From genuine monsters, live-streaming mass atrocities in

The opposition has vowed to reform Australia’s “terrible” new encryption laws, which currently give Australian security agencies unprecedented powers to access encrypted messages. Labor helped pass the Assistance and Access Bill which created the laws late last year with an agreement from government that significant amendments would be made early

The local tech industry has reiterated its concerns over Australia’s controversial encryption laws, as Australian Federal Police documents reveal the new powers are already being exercised.  The Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Act 2018 passed in a hasty fashion on the final sitting day of parliament last

It is a fairly binary question: should paedophiles have an absolute right to privacy? Should those who would do the community harm through acts of mass murder be allowed to operate free from digital harassment by law enforcement and intelligence services? Sign up for Which-50’s Irregular Insights newsletter And if