customer experience

customer experience

As a strategy, customer experience runs the risk of devolving into the sort of absurdist platitudes that you might expect to find on a cat poster. Put the customer first. Learn to listen. Empathise. All worthy virtues, to be sure, but these are things that are easy to say and

We’ve all heard the stories about customer experience where brands that go to extraordinary lengths to delight a consumer. The home visit bearing gifts. The call from the CEO. The impromptu tropical vacation to reward your loyalty. There’s no doubt that this sort of delight is a powerful currency, particularly

Australian businesses are getting better at digital, but don’t get too excited. The threshold test is very very low. When SAP released its first Australian Digital Experience Report 18 months ago, its researchers found a smoking ruin. With its latest edition, the company suggests the outlook is a little better —

More evidence linking customer experience to revenues growth More evidence this weeks, as if any were needed that better customer experience directly drives revenue growth. This time it’s a study by Sitecore and Avanade of 880 decision makers in six countries, including Australia. Subscribe today: Sign up for  Which-50’s Irregular

You may have heard that McDonald’s announced strong quarterly results yesterday. The quick-service restaurant chain reported a five per cent increase in global same-store sales and the second quarter in a row of same-store sales growth in the US after seven quarters of declines. What’s remarkable (or perhaps not) about this

Customers today demand more than good products or services. They expect an exceptional customer experience. “CEOs, CIOs and chief marketing officers have become interested in this topic because low-cost and ubiquitous access to information for customers, the rise of globalisation, and the ‘death of distance’ mean that customers are more

Senior banking executives around the world having a lend of themselves when they say core banking systems are holding back the shift to digital. Instead, there seems to be a cultural problem that puts the emphasis on sales ahead of customer needs and experiences. In simple terms, bankers don’t get

Most companies imagine themselves to be customer focused. Most aren’t. But a rare few genuinely live the meaning of it every day, and build customer experiences that are a direct extension of brand and culture. Alton Lane, the bespoke men’s tailor currently operating in seven US locations and with grand