Cambridge Analytica

It is twelve months since GDPR came into force, but you need to look back a little further to really appreciate why the world is now very different for marketers than it was a year and a day ago. And why it risks becoming toxic for advertising technology and marketing

Facebook plans to make its platform more privacy-focused, built around several principles core to the way WhatsApp has been developed, according to CEO Mark Zuckerberg. During the F8 conference in San Jose earlier this week the CEO opened the event saying the company will focus on the most fundamental and

Facebook told investors it’s setting aside $3 billion to cover an impending fine from the FTC, to settle an investigation which was opened in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The matter remains unresolved, but the company is estimating the fine will be between $3 billion and $5 billion.

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg was not even born in early 1982 when the mandated breakup of Bell System began, a move that ultimately slashed the value of the giant and previously unassailable AT&T by 70 percent. He was 15 when Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson found that Microsoft was

UK policy makers have been urged to implement tighter rules around how digital ads can be used in elections, while Facebook is set for more scrutiny from European regulators. Those are two key takeaways from the British Information Commissioner’s investigation into the role of data analytics in elections. Launched in

Deleting Facebook, smartphone

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) is looking into Facebook’s most recent security breach to determine how many Australians were affected by the hack. Over the weekend Facebook disclosed hackers had exploited a vulnerability that allowed them to access 50 million Facebook accounts. In a statement published on

Facebook is facing a possible class action lawsuit in Australia and small fines in the UK, as the fallout from the Cambridge Analytica scandal continues.   First to the UK where Britain’s privacy watchdog has announced it plans to fine Facebook  £500,000 for failing to keep its users’ information safe.

Apple appears to be bracing itself for a turf-war with the ad-tech community, stepping in to protect its users from Facebook’s increasingly nefarious privacy practices via an upgrade to its Safari browser across mobile and desktop. At this week’s annual WWDC conference, Apple’s SVP of software, Craig Federighi announced that

When digital platforms and services are provided to you for “free” you are the product. This value exchange – products and services for user data – is becoming better understood by consumers, but perhaps not as clearly as many in the technology sector imagine. The recent revelations involving Facebook and

Cambridge Analytica, the data firm at the centre of the Facebook privacy scandal, is shutting down. The company has filed applications to commence insolvency in the UK and US overnight, saying they had been “vilified” for practice which was a “standard component” of digital advertising. Sign up to Which-50’s Digital