Alibaba

When Alibaba floats later this week, it is expected to be the largest IPO ever — exceeding even that of Visa in 2008. And while much of the attention will focus on the headline number in the early days after it it goes public, research outfit Ovum suggests that there

  A profile on Alibaba founder Jack Ma, Target’s omnichannel experience  and Twitter as a retailer were the three big conversation charters in the omnichannel social stream this week. But just as interesting were the sources of those shares; the BBC, a Target management conference and a pop music webzine.

China is looking more and more like an accelerating demon in contemporary commerce. Aside from all the obvious characteristics, its embrace of Singapore-styled capitalism is becoming almost theatrical in its breadth. We noted earlier the big bet placed by China’s telecom regulators in creating space for a local mobile phone

China’s bank regulators, having slept on it for a few months, have approved the entry of new players. But TenCent — the digital intruder that had its banking initiative put in limbo earlier in the year — will be required to bring partners to its venture. While initial reports suggested

Ecommerce giant Alibaba has purchased the outstanding shares in mobile browser maker UCWeb, in what it says is China’s biggest Internet merger. The company already owned about two thirds of the company from earlier transactions, starting back in 2009. In a statement translated by Techinasia.com, Alibaba executives noted, “Today’s Alibaba

Australia Post will accelerate its China push and, by extension, the entree of Australian brands into the market by offering an Alibaba shop front on Tmall — underpinned by a suite of free services such as translation and customer support, Which-50 has learned. An announcement is expected as early as