IT and marketing are normally seen as different ends of a spectrum, but when the Chief Marketing Officer and the Chief Information Officer come together, their union can create a culture where teams can work together. 

Both sides clearly have the best interests of the business at heart — but each is coming at it from a different perspective, says Andrea Martens, CEO of ADMA. 

Martens says marketing is looking for the ability to be able to react quickly to changes in market conditions and to adjust campaign activity accordingly. 

“IT doesn’t want to stop this, but needs to ensure it’s done in a way that is consistent with company policy, compliant with law and secure from a data perspective — and sometimes those goals are difficult to reconcile.”

Companies need to embrace communication within their ecosystem to ensure closer cooperation between marketing and technology. 

“Each group needs to better understand the others incentives and concerns,” Martens says. 

Looking back at the past five years, the marketing and IT departments are moving closer to each other than ever before, says Murray Howe, founder of The Markitects. 

He says that as that is happening, a number of factors have been coming into play. Not least of which is the point of origin for each party. 

“Marketing and IT are from vastly different experience centres, they have vastly different mindsets and expectations of each other, yet they are being asked to work in concert like never before.”

Howe says that for the first time, IT had an internal customer it has never had before: marketing. 

“What does that mean? The first thing that comes to mind for me is mindset and skillset. Marketers are right-brain thinkers, driven by their experience in the market. The market is unpredictable and uncontrollable. This means marketers are inherently more intuitive and creative in their approach to problem solving and expectations of how people should be working with them.

“Whereas technologists are more left-brain in their thinking. They value sequencing, linear thinking, mathematics, facts and logic. They value the process, they value certainty in things like time requirements and outcome of delivery.”

About this author

Athina Mallis is the editor of the Which-50 Digital Intelligence Unit of which ADMA is a corporate member. Members provide their insights and expertise for the benefit of the Which-50 community. Membership fees apply. 

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