The widespread consensus that we are in the midst of a new golden age of television is predicated on the combination of sophisticated storytelling and distribution platforms that put the power in the hands of the audience.

Indeed, it has given rise to a new term — ‘binge-watching’ — meaning to watch a large number of television programmes, usually from a single series, in succession.

So Maryel Roman-Price, Field Marketing Manager at Magento, an Adobe company, asks: why not adapt that ideology to webinar creation?

Webinars can be powerful tools to generate demand and diversify your channel offering —particularly when combined with a story that brings value to your audience.

“It’s cheaper than physical events, it can be wide-cast or as targeted as you want it to be. But a lot of marketers do it, so you have to stand out somehow, and you don’t necessarily have to spend a lot of money or do something out of this world [to achieve that],” Roman-Price says.

The secret is in the planning, and in listening to your audience and adapting accordingly. Look at all possible data points, Roman-Price says, and if something isn’t working, don’t be afraid to change it up.

When it comes to the development of creative content, Roman-Price says your own experience is a good starting point. What works for you probably works for the majority, she says.

“Start with that, then tweak it according to your target audience’s preferences. Look at what’s working for others — you don’t really have to re-invent the wheel, just make it better and your own. Sometimes, an idea just pops out of nowhere. You just need to expose yourself out there by reading, networking, watching, and, of course by listening to your own audience — they are always more than happy to propose ideas.”

Having a level of input can also help organisations foster audience loyalty, because it shows you value your audience’s opinions and listen to what they have to say.

“Give them air time by answering their questions and being readily available should they have more questions,” Roman-Price advises. “Make it easy for them to follow your series — have a great UX [user experience] on your webinar platform, have it available on-demand, and offer resources and not just sell to them. They sign-up and watch to learn, so give them that and entertain them at the same time.”

The elements often missing from a webinar ‘series’ are consistency and a continuous narrative. It is easy to deviate as webinar ‘episodes’ evolve. That is why having a plan that plots the narrative can be so helpful — as long as you are prepared to adapt accordingly should it fail to resonate with your audience.

Above all, never underestimate the power of being fun.

“To be ‘binge-worthy’, [a webinar] has to be addictive and likeable,” Roman-Price says. “If you make it fun, then it’ll be enjoyable both for your team and the people watching it.”

Maryel Roman-Price is a presenter and panellist at Webinar World in Sydney on Thursday 2 April.

About the author

Georgina Swan is an award-winning journalist, editor and communications specialist. On24 is a corporate member of the Which-50 Digital Intelligence Unit. Our members provide their insights and expertise for the benefit of the Which-50 community. Membership fees apply. 

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