Mike Gee

Mike Gee

One of Australia's most respected and experienced media experts, Mike Gee is a multi-award winning journalist, editor, photographer, broadcaster, author and columnist with 40 years experience in all forms of print and online publishing.

Consumer trust is a complex conversation as it works on many levels depending on where – and on how – a brand operates in the business spectrum. But there is no disguising the importance of organising your development or transformation around customers needs. For three brands – Xinja, Lion and

The 7-Eleven chain of convenience stores is at the old-school-business end of the trust equation. But time and technology have changed all that – as did introducing $1 coffees. For 7-Eleven, which has traditionally been firmly a bricks and mortar, ‘your-local-deli-on-the-corner’, business, online consumerism is a disruption that has to

There are three layers of trust at which brands need to excel if they are going to build genuinely engaging relationships. However, understanding this alone is not enough. Trust in business is a currency that has value and is fundamental to financial growth in the experience-driven economies we see today.

There are three layers of trust at which brands need to excel if they are going to build genuinely engaging relationships. However, understanding this alone is not enough. Trust in business is a currency that has value and is fundamental to financial growth in the experience-driven economies we see today.

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The key trigger driving upgrades or investment in technology is an organisation’s growth and transformation agenda. Business leaders tell us that investment in technology drives efficiencies which enable re-allocation of resources to deliver on growth initiatives. And 2019-2020 represents a tidal wave of change, with a shift in both buying power

According to a new IBRS study, integration is proving to be a challenge for the growing number of organisations where business units have procured cloud-based applications with only superficial IT involvement. For example, IBRS has noted that human resources departments that procured Software as a Service (SaaS) based e-learning and human

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Local government is at the apex of change. Councils must move forward technologically to be able to deliver the services their ratepayers now demand and must do so efficiently and cost-effectively on all levels. Legacy systems are old, expensive, inefficient systems. It’s that simple. Ironically though, council financial managers are

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Shadow IT sounds like a covert — quite possibly dark — force. And to some people it may well be. But the truth is both far simpler and more complex. According to Cisco, Shadow IT is the use of IT-related hardware or software by a department or individual without the

A study of senior ANZ executives’ attitudes, expectations and plans for enterprise software has found that satisfaction levels with enterprise solutions remains low, but that adoption of ‘as-a-service’ software is changing this. The IBRS report paints a picture of the complex struggle between management and their staff when it comes to

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Digital transformation is no longer optional for local government, it’s a necessity. Old, fragmented legacy systems can no longer offer the solutions and services necessary to keep pace with rapid technological change, or the outcomes executives and planners are setting in stone. Nor can they meet the demands of an