Augie Ray

Augie Ray

Augie Ray is the Research Director Covering Customer Experience for Marketing Leaders at Gartner

An apple sitting next to an orange

Virtually every customer experience (CX) leader struggles with one common issue: How do I acquire the attention and commitment I need from bosses and peers? How do I get them to care so that the CX program can secure the necessary budgets, collaboration, and resources? Sign up to Which-50’s Digital

I generally hate blog posts and articles that suggest there is a single trick, hack or tip that can change your world. (I swear if I see one more headline promising the one habit that can turn me into Jeff Bezos or Warren Buffet, my head will explode.) But, there

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about the language of customer experience. I have hundreds of conversations with clients every year, and my job is to efficiently get to the heart of a CX problem and expeditiously offer practical guidance. My advisory sessions start with clients describing their CX goals or

In part one of this blog post, we explored how the language of marketing and business pervades our work lives and discourages the customer centricity our organisations seek. For example, at work, we use language like “content” and “engagement,” but at home, have you ever said “I saw some good content

“We want to become a more customer-centric organisation.” As a customer experience researcher and advisor, I hear that phrase every single week. I suspect you may, too. Achieving this is, of course, important for brand health and financial success. Customer-centric organisations are eating the world. Amazon, which seeks to “become Earth’s

Brands do not (and should not) improve customer experience (CX) simply because it feels right to have happier customers. The reason to invest in CX is to deliver more loyal customers—customers who spend more, churn less, are less costly to serve, inclined to recommend or refer others, and more likely

Is there any business catchphrase more ubiquitous nowadays than “digital transformation”? Everyone craves the agility, innovation, relevance,  engagement, reputation, loyalty, and brand advocacy that digital transformation promises. But how many are willing to do what it takes to achieve the sort of digital transformation that matters? If your organisation wants a meaningful digital

future, prediction

As an analyst covering customer experience, I am often briefed by multichannel, personalisation, and marketing automation platforms. Many promise to help brands improve their customer experience by identifying and executing the “next best action” for each of their individual customers. The idea, in theory, is that your brand can improve its

IKEA furniture assembling

The business world loves easy answers, but the secret to success is often shrouded in nuance. Take the current trend in customer experience (CX): Effortless and frictionless experiences. In a world of “unexpectedly high call volumes,” complicated return policies, and mobile apps that make us want to hurl our phones,

Case studies. Everyone craves them. But are they success guideposts to follow, or might they have the power to mislead us? The lure of case studies is that they offer us peeks at others’ success, providing useful models or best practices to follow. But I’ve always feared that case studies can give something a