Andrew Birmingham

Andrew Birmingham

Andrew Birmingham is the editor-in-chief and publisher of Which-50. He is the former associate publisher of The Australian Financial Review and remains a contributing editor, and during his career he has reported on the Australian media, technology, finance, life science and related sectors over a period spanning 20 years. His work has been published by The AFR, The Australian, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, MIS, Computerworld, CIO, ARN, Network World, CRN Australia, and My Business.

Consumers comprehensively reject the practice of brands, publishers and platforms tracking their internet behaviour without their explicit consent, according to research commissioned by Which-50. Yet few sites or services allow for this, and instead assume implicit acceptance based on terms and conditions which few consumers have read — and even

Cloud-based contact centre solutions offer a number of advantages over on-premise solutions such as the high speed of deployment, the ability to avoid upfront costs, and of course opportunity to scale capacity up and down on-demand, and so adjust to market conditions. That’s a key take away from a new

An illuminating finding from recent research published by IRBS in its State of Enterprise Software Report 2019 is the revelation that line of business leaders are increasingly taking more responsibility for purchasing decisions around business applications — ahead of the IT department. And that, in turn, also changes both the nature of their relationship

digital leadership

Every once and a while I derive a small measure of voyeuristic pleasure from looking at the jobs Linkedin recommends for me. Since I have no intention of applying for any of them, I thought for a bit of fun I’d share what I consider to be the eight most

Many cloud projects commence on the basis of cost — perhaps because the organisation wants to shift spending from capital expenditure to operating expenditure. Or because their analysis suggests they can lower total cost of ownership over time by renting IT services more cost-efficiently than they might otherwise buy them.

Government organisations are exploring cloud-first approaches to their customer service computing needs. To make the transition successfully, they need to overcome some challenges specific to the public sector  — and cloud service providers need to understand them. Chris Fryer, Enterprise Architect, NEC Australia, offers several key insights about the particular

While issues like total cost of ownership, and a desire to avoid capital expenditure might lead businesses to look into cloud computing initially, many executives rapidly come to understand that cloud computing also offers the opportunity to increase revenue through better service delivery and improved customer experience. This is especially

While many of the drivers of cloud migration are common across government and enterprise, each has a slightly different set of priorities. Typically both are concerned about cost, risk, speed of innovation, and improving the customer experience — though the emphasis they place on each of these tends to differ.

Twenty-five years ago this week, Doug Weaver was the Eastern Advertising Director for Wired Magazine when he and his team sold the first banner ad to AT&T. From little things, big things grow. This year brands will spend over half a trillion dollars on digital advertising, representing over 60 per

As the world sees the distribution of billions of smart devices, and literally trillions of new sensors, the current computing paradigms will struggle to meet the needs of new applications in such an environment. Edge computing is emerging as part of the solution. In the edge computing model, programming and